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Decolonizing agriculture in the United States: Centering the knowledges of women and people of color to support relational farming practices.

Authors
  • Layman, Emma1
  • Civita, Nicole2
  • 1 University of Colorado at Boulder, 4001 Discovery Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 USA.
  • 2 Sterling College, 16 Sterling Drive, Craftsbury Common, VT 05827 USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Agriculture and human values
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2022
Volume
39
Issue
3
Pages
965–978
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10460-022-10297-3
PMID: 35106023
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

While the agricultural knowledges and practices of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) and women have shaped agriculture in the US, these knowledges have been colonized, exploited, and appropriated, cleaving space for the presently dominant white male agricultural narrative. Simultaneously, these knowledges and practices have been transformed to fit within a society that values individualism, production, efficiency, and profit. The authors use a decolonial Feminist Political Ecology framework to highlight the ways in which the knowledges of Indigenous, Black, and women farmers have been and are being colonized; a tradition that makes alternative agriculture a predominantly white space. The authors interviewed 10 BIPOC and women farmers in Colorado to understand what values and knowledges were shaping their often-appropriated agricultural practices. Three themes emerged: people, place, and patterns. By centering these values, farmers create relational agricultural practices that support the well-being of human and more-than-human beings. To support the widespread implementation of these practices, food systems practitioners must elevate the voices and knowledges of historically excluded farmers. Only then can truly just and equitable alternative agricultural practices be realized in the US. © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature B.V. 2022.

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