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Decellularized equine carotid artery layers as matrix for regenerated neurites of spiral ganglion neurons.

Authors
  • Yilmaz-Bayraktar, Suheda1, 2
  • Schwieger, Jana1, 2
  • Scheper, Verena1, 2, 3
  • Lenarz, Thomas1, 2, 3
  • Böer, Ulrike2, 4
  • Kreienmeyer, Michaela1, 2
  • Torrente, Mariela5
  • Doll, Theodor1, 6
  • 1 Department of Otolaryngology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 2 Lower Saxony Centre for Biomedical Engineering, Implant Research and Development (NIFE), Hannover, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 3 Cluster of Excellence Hearing4All, Hannover, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 4 Department of Cardiothoracic, Transplantation and Vascular Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 5 Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile. , (Chile)
  • 6 Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine, Hannover, Germany. , (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
The International Journal of Artificial Organs
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
May 01, 2020
Volume
43
Issue
5
Pages
332–342
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/0391398819868481
PMID: 31434531
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Today's best solution in compensating for sensorineural hearing loss is the cochlear implant, which electrically stimulates the spiral ganglion neurons in the inner ear. An optimum hearing impression is not ensured due to, among other reasons, a remaining anatomical gap between the spiral ganglion neurons and the implant electrodes. The gap could be bridged via pharmacologically triggered neurite growth toward the electrodes if biomaterials for neurite guidance could be provided. For this, we investigated the suitability of decellularized tissue. We compared three different layers (tunica adventitia, tunica media, and tunica intima) of decellularized equine carotid arteries in a preliminary approach. Rat spiral ganglia explants were cultured on decellularized equine carotid artery layers and neurite sprouting was assessed quantitatively. Generally, neurite outgrowth was possible and it was most prominent on the intima (in average 83 neurites per spiral ganglia explants, followed by the adventitia (62 neurites) and the lowest growth on the media (20 neurites). Thus, decellularized equine carotid arteries showed promising effects on neurite regeneration and can be developed further as efficient biomaterials for neural implants in hearing research.

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