Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

A decade of next-generation sequencing in genodermatoses: the impact on gene discovery and clinical diagnostics.

Authors
  • Chiu, F P-C1
  • Doolan, B J1
  • McGrath, J A1
  • Onoufriadis, A1
  • 1 St John's Institute of Dermatology, School of Basic and Medical Biosciences, King's College London, London, UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
British Journal of Dermatology
Publisher
Wiley (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2021
Volume
184
Issue
4
Pages
606–616
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/bjd.19384
PMID: 32628274
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Discovering the genetic basis of inherited skin diseases is fundamental to improving diagnostic accuracy and genetic counselling. In the 1990s and 2000s, genetic linkage and candidate gene approaches led to the molecular characterization of several dozen genodermatoses, but over the past decade the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has accelerated diagnostic discovery and precision. This review examines the application of NGS technologies from 2009 to 2019 that have (i) led to the initial discovery of gene mutations in known or new genodermatoses and (ii) identified involvement of more than one contributing pathogenic gene in individuals with complex Mendelian skin disorder phenotypes. A comprehensive review of the PubMed database and dermatology conference abstracts was undertaken between January 2009 and December 2019. The results were collated and cross-referenced with OMIM. We identified 166 new disease-gene associations in inherited skin diseases discovered by NGS. Of these, 131 were previously recognized, while 35 were brand new disorders. Eighty-five were autosomal dominant (with 43 of 85 mutations occurring de novo), 78 were autosomal recessive and three were X-linked. We also identified 63 cases harbouring multiple pathogenic mutations, either involving two coexisting genodermatoses (n = 13) or an inherited skin disorder in conjunction with other organ system phenotypes (n = 50). NGS technologies have accelerated disease-gene discoveries in dermatology over the last decade. Moreover, the era of NGS has enabled clinicians to split complex Mendelian phenotypes into separate diseases. These genetic data improve diagnostic precision and make feasible accurate prenatal testing and better-targeted translational research. © 2020 The Authors. British Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Association of Dermatologists.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times