Affordable Access

A decade of international change in abortion law: 1967-1977.

Authors
  • Cook, R J
  • Dickens, B M
Type
Published Article
Journal
American journal of public health
Publication Date
Jul 01, 1978
Volume
68
Issue
7
Pages
637–644
Identifiers
PMID: 665881
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Modern thinking on abortion, reflected in recent legal developments around the world, has turned from concentration upon criminality in favor of female and family well-being. New laws enacted during the last decade are coming to focus upon conditions of health and social welfare of women and their existing families as indications for lawful termination of pregnancy. Regulations governing the delivery of services may be restrictive, however, so as to limit in practice access to means of safe, legal abortion made available in theory. Requirements may be imposed that only medical personnel with unduly high qualifications perform procedures, or that they be undertaken only in institutions meeting standards higher than similar health care requires. Approval procedures may be established involving second medical opinions or committees to monitor observance of the law, which may delay abortions and therefore increase their hazards. Parental and spousal consent requirements may exist in addition with the same effects, or to veto a pregnant female's request. Regulations may be employed more positively, however, to encourage contraceptive practice. A disappointment with legislative reform is that it may fail to improve circumstances if public resources are not applied to achieve the supply of services newly rendered legitimate, and illegal practice may persist.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times