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Jejunal pouch to avoid stricture after esophagojejunostomy with circular stapler11 No competing interests declared.

Authors
Journal
Journal of the American College of Surgeons
1072-7515
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
189
Issue
5
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/s1072-7515(99)00161-1
Disciplines
  • Biology
  • Medicine

Abstract

Abstract Background: Anastomotic stricture is one of the most common problems in esophagojejunostomy using the end-to-end anastomosing (EEA) instrument (Auto Suture Co, Norwalk, CT) after total gastrectomy. To alleviate the stricture, several methods, such as incision to the scar, balloon dilatation, and steroid injection are available. To avoid stricture, the jejunal pouch may allow use of a larger EEA than Roux-en-Y (ReY) reconstruction does. Study Design: A total of 45 patients underwent curative total gastrectomy and esophagojejunostomy with jejunal pouch construction (27 patients) or ReY (18 patients), using the EEA. The effects of jejunal pouch construction with a large EEA on avoidance of stricture and benefit to nutritional status were investigated by comparing it with the ReY in terms of postoperative morbidity, postprandial symptoms, and nutritional parameters (serum protein, serum albumin, body weight). Results: EEA28 or larger could be used in 25 patients in the pouch group and 8 patients in the ReY group (p < 0.05). Stricture developed in one patient in the pouch group and in four patients in the ReY group (p < 0.05). Postprandial symptoms were experienced less frequently (p < 0.05) in the pouch group than in the ReY group. When stricture and symptoms were analyzed according to the size of EEA, they occurred more frequently (p < 0.05) in the patients with EEA25 than those with EEA28 or EEA31. No significant differences were evident in nutritional parameters. Conclusions: The choice of jejunal pouch technique allowed the use of a larger EEA than that of ReY reconstruction, resulting in avoidance of anastomotic stricture and postprandial symptoms, though little benefit in nutritional status was evident to the patients after total gastrectomy.

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