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The collection of lymph from intact peripheral cutaneous lymphatics of man

Authors
Journal
Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
0022-2143
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Keywords
  • Laboratory Methods
Disciplines
  • Medicine

Abstract

Abstract A method for the cannulation and collection of fluid from the cutaneous lymphatics of the extremities of man after visualization of the lymphatics by the intradermal injection of a vital dye has been presented. In 33 experiments 115 lymphatic cannulations have been attempted. The lymphatics were entered 72 times, in one-half of which the quantity of lymph collected was sufficient for measurement. Blood was obtained on 15 occasions from streamers which appeared to be lymphatics, indicating that some studies of visualized lymphatics have probably included small venous channels as well. Since only a small amount of data concerned with the electrolyte content of lymph has been collected, no attempt has been made to evaluate differences between subjects. It has been pointed out that due to the small volumes of fluid and hazards of contamination the possibility of errors in these determinations exists. Concentrations of electrolytes determined by standard techniques on larger volumes of edema fluid are presented for comparison. When a small volume of fluid is not a limiting factor, the collection of lymph by this technique has potential usefulness in the study of cytologic content, transport of crystalloids, colloids or tracer substances, antibody responses, or other processes in conditions not necessarily related to edema.

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