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ACTORS, CAUSES, AND PHASES IN THE DECISION-MAKING PROCESS OF RELOCATED FIRMS IN THE NETHERLANDS

Authors
Disciplines
  • Economics

Abstract

barcanieuw2.PDF Faculty of Spatial Sciences PO Box 800 9700 AV Groningen The Netherlands Tel + 31 50 363 38 85 Fax + 31 50 363 39 01 E-mail: [email protected] Actors, causes, and phases in the decision-making process of relocated firms in the Netherlands By Cees-Jan Pen Unit Economic Geography University of Groningen Groningen, June 2000 1 1. Introduction 1.1 The general formulation of a problem In economic geography, the usefulness of location theories and research on decision- making in real relocations has been problematic, while locational analysis is at the heart of regional science. This is caused by unrealistic and simplifying normative assumptions of the more (post-)positivist and structuralist researchers, who dominate this research area. On the other side, the more realistic behavioural and institutional interpretative research is too descriptive, as well as practical oriented and policy driven. Qualitative approaches are based on case studies, which makes the drawing of general conclusions and the execution of statistics a rather interpretative and vulnerable process. Relocation fits to the seven attributes of strategy (Mintzberg, Ahlstrand, and Lampel, 1999): (1) relates to the organisation and the environment; (2) is complex; (3) influences the performance of the organisation; (4) relates to content and process; (5) is not always deliberate; (6) influence all organisational levels; (7) is analytical (information collection is necessary) and conceptual (something innovative is done). Shrivastava and Mitroff (1984, page 18) identify a similar gap, as noted in the first paragraph, between theory and practice in the strategic business management literature on decision-making: “the usefulness of organisational theory and research for practical decision-making has been limited”. In his unpublished dissertation, Khatri (State University of New York, 1994) argues that the extant research on strategic decision making seems peripheral to strategy issues: (1) it is mostly de

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