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Day-to-day and longer-term longitudinal associations between physical activity, sedentary behavior, and sleep in children.

Authors
  • Antczak, Devan1
  • Sanders, Taren1
  • Del Pozo Cruz, Borja1
  • Parker, Philip1
  • Lonsdale, Chris1
  • 1 Institute for Positive Psychology and Education, Australian Catholic University, North Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
SLEEP
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Apr 09, 2021
Volume
44
Issue
4
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/sleep/zsaa219
PMID: 33103724
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To determine the day-to-day and longer-term longitudinal associations between daytime physical activity and night-time sleep. We used data from a 2-year longitudinal study which included three time points (i.e. baseline, year 1, and year 2). Participants were recruited from primary schools and included 1059 children (50% girls) with a mean age of 8.81-years-old (SD = 0.72) at baseline. Sleep variables included sleep duration, sleep efficiency, time in bed, sleep onset, and wake time. Physical activity variables included light, moderate, moderate-to-vigorous, and vigorous physical activity as well as sedentary time. We objectively assessed physical activity and sleep behaviors using the GENEActiv wrist-worn accelerometer over an 8-day period at each timepoint for a potential 21 190 observed days. We used fixed-effects multilevel models and parallel latent growth curve modeling to examine day-to-day and longer-term associations, respectively. Day-to-day, physical activity, and sleep variables were significantly, positively, and bidirectionally associated, except for sleep efficiency, which showed little association with physical activity. Longer-term, we found little association between physical activity and sleep variables. Overall, our findings indicate that there is a day-to-day association between the amount of time spent being physically active and improved sleep. The lack of a longer-term association indicates that a focus on children's daily behavior may be most appropriate to help children improve sleep and increase physical activity. © Sleep Research Society 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail [email protected]

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