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Daily uplifts, daily hassles, and coping in military veterans' post-deployment reintegration.

Authors
  • Larsson, Gerry1, 2
  • Nilsson, Sofia1
  • Ohlsson, Alicia1
  • 1 Swedish Defence University, Karlstad, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 2 Inland University College of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway. , (Norway)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Scandinavian Journal of Psychology
Publisher
Wiley (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2024
Volume
65
Issue
1
Pages
16–25
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/sjop.12949
PMID: 37399267
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Our first aim was to explore the relationship between daily uplifts, daily hassles, and coping styles the first year after returning from international military missions and post-deployment work, family, and private reintegration in military veterans. Our second aim was to identify individual patterns regarding daily uplifts, daily hassles, and coping styles and to explore how they relate to the above-mentioned aspects of post-deployment reintegration. Questionnaire responses were received from 446 Swedish military veterans. Regression analyses showed that daily hassles and an escape-avoidance coping style made significant contributions in the predicted, negative direction to the amount of explained variance on reintegration indicator scales. A high level of perceived threat during the last mission also contributed to more negative integration. Using a person-centered approach, three unique profiles of response patterns were identified using a cluster analysis based on the uplift, hassles, and coping style scores. One profile was labeled "resilient and well-functioning"; its members showed favorable reintegration scores. A second profile was called "ambitious and struggling." These individuals scored medium-high on the reintegration scales. The third profile consistently indicated the least favorable reintegration scores and was labeled "worried and avoidant." The results confirm and deepen our existing knowledge. © 2023 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology published by Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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