Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

A daily study of stressors, continuously measured glucose, and diabetes symptoms in latinos with type 2 diabetes.

Authors
  • Wagner, Julie1
  • Armeli, Stephen2
  • Tennen, Howard3
  • Bermudez-Millan, Angela3
  • Wolpert, Howard4
  • Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael5
  • 1 Division of Behavioral Sciences and Community Health and Department of Psychiatry, UConn Schools of Dental Medicine and Medicine, UConn Health, 263 Farmington Ave, Farmington, CT, 06030, USA. [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Psychology, Farleigh Dickinson University, Teaneck, NJ, USA.
  • 3 Department of Public Health Sciences, UConn School of Medicine, Farmington, CT, USA.
  • 4 Harvard Medical School, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, MA, USA.
  • 5 Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of behavioral medicine
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2021
Volume
44
Issue
1
Pages
94–103
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10865-020-00162-1
PMID: 32494976
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

This study examined whether daily stressors and continuously monitored glucose levels and glucose variability predict daily diabetes symptoms. Fifty Latinos with type 2 diabetes were randomized to either diabetes education (DE-only; N = 23) or DE plus stress management and relaxation training (DE + SMR; N = 32). After treatment, for 7 days they wore 'blinded' continuous glucose monitors and reported common stressors and diabetes symptoms twice daily. Between individuals, participants with more numerous overall stressors and more time in hyperglycemia reported higher symptoms. Within individuals, symptoms were higher during intervals of greater than usual stressors. Yet, diabetes symptoms did not covary with changes in glucose levels or glucose variability. The within-person stressor-symptom association was stronger among older individuals and non-significant for participants in DE + SMR condition. Diabetes symptoms were associated with recent stressor exposure, but not recent glucose level or changes in glucose. CLINICAL TRIAL NUMBER: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (No. NCT01578096).

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times