Affordable Access

Differences in quality of romantic relationships in college females based on family status : divorced or intact

Authors
Publication Date
Keywords
  • Adult Children Of Divorced Parents -- Psychology
  • Women College Students -- Psychology
  • Man-Woman Relationships

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine differences in quality of romantic relationships in college females based on parents’ marital status. Many studies have investigated various effects of divorce on children, but less research has investigated the long-term effects of parental divorce on variables such as quality of romantic relationships. Participants included 101 female undergraduate students from both divorced and intact families, all in a current romantic relationship. Participants were group administered four questionnaires: a demographics form, the Parent Bonding Instrument (Parker, Tupling, & Brown, 1979) the Children’s Perceptions of Interparental Conflict Scale (Grych & Fincham, 1990) and the Perceived Relationship Quality Components scale (Fletcher, Simpson & Thomas, 2002). A One-Way MANCOVA was used to examine differences in quality of romantic relationships between females from divorced families and females from intact families while controlling for parental conflict. It was hypothesized that females from divorced families would report lower levels of trust, commitment, intimacy, and love than females from intact families. It was further hypothesized that females from divorced families would report higher levels of passion than females from intact families. Results indicated no differences between groups on any measures of quality of romantic relationships. Implications and recommendations for future research will be discussed.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.