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The effect of alterations in the physical state of the membrane lipids on the ability ofAcholeplasma laidlawiiB to grow at various temperatures

Authors
Journal
Journal of Molecular Biology
0022-2836
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
84
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/0022-2836(74)90218-6
Disciplines
  • Ecology
  • Geography

Abstract

Abstract The physical state of the membrane lipids, as determined by fatty acid composition and environmental temperature, has a marked effect on both the temperature range within which Acholeplasma laidlawii B cells can grow and on growth rates within the permissible temperature ranges. The minimum growth temperature of 8 °C is not defined by the fatty acid composition of the membrane lipids when cells are enriched in fatty acids giving rise to gel to liquid-crystalline membrane lipid phase transitions occurring below this temperature. The elevated minimum growth temperatures of cells enriched in fatty acids giving rise to lipid phase transitions occurring at higher temperatures, however, are clearly defined by the fatty acid composition of the membrane lipids. The optimum and maximum growth temperatures are also influenced indirectly by the physical state of the membrane lipids, being significantly reduced for cells supplemented with lower melting, unsaturated fatty acids. The temperature coefficient of growth at temperatures near or above the midpoint of the lipid phase transition is 16 to 18 kcal mol , but this value increases abruptly to 40 to 45 kcal mol at temperatures below the phase transition midpoint. Both the absolute rates and temperature coefficients of cell growth are similar for cells whose membrane lipids exist entirely or predominantly in the liquid-crystalline state, but absolute growth rates decline rapidly and temperature coefficients increase at temperatures where more than half of the membrane lipids become solidified. Cell growth ceases when the conversion of the membrane lipid to the gel state approaches completion, but growth and replication can continue at temperatures where less than one tenth of the total lipid remains in the fluid state. An appreciable heterogeneity in the physical state of the membrane lipids can apparently be tolerated by this organism without a detectable loss of membrane function.

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