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Switching of cortical Up and Down states: reproduction of the Shu-Hasenstaub-McCormick experiment from a conductance-based model

Authors
Journal
BMC Neuroscience
1471-2202
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
Volume
12
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2202-12-s1-p39
Keywords
  • Poster Presentation

Abstract

Switching of cortical Up and Down states: reproduction of the Shu-Hasenstaub-McCormick experiment from a conductance-based model POSTER PRESENTATION Open Access Switching of cortical Up and Down states: reproduction of the Shu-Hasenstaub-McCormick experiment from a conductance-based model Arne Weigenand1,2,3, Thomas Martinetz1,3, Jens Christian Claussen1,2,3* From Twentieth Annual Computational Neuroscience Meeting: CNS*2011 Stockholm, Sweden. 23-28 July 2011 Cortical Up- and Down states are a salient feature of mammalian slow wave sleep and contribute predominan- tely to the low frequency (1Hz and below) delta power of the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG).The role of slow wave oscillations recently raised considerable attention from the observation that slow waves can be electrically stimulated [1,2], and that after such a stimulation, a signif- icant increase in memory consolidation can be observed [1]. Cortical slow-waves are comprised of collective depo- larzation (Up) and polarization (Down) phases whereby Up phases show an increased firing rate reminescent of wakefulness [3] and Down states are characterized by comparatively silent levels of neural activity. A recent experimental demonstration of Up- and Down state switching under electrical stimulation was presented by Shu, Hasenstaub and McCormick [4]. Their experiment showed that in ferret brain slices an Up state could be triggered electrically, as well as that by stimulation during the Up state by an impulse of same polarity, the Up state could be terminated, and the dependence of the Up state duration depending on the impulse amplitude and the time difference between the two impulses was studied quantitatively. In a previous study, we have proposed a minimal model mimicking the interplay between recurrent excitation and inhibition controlled by slow adaptive currents [5]. By this quite generic model the experimental time- dependence already can be explained. While the model needs only few parameters, it does not

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