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Oxytocin selectively gates fear responses through distinct outputs from the central amygdala.

Authors
Journal
Science
0036-8075
Publisher
American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
Publication Date
Volume
333
Issue
6038
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1126/science.1201043
Keywords
  • Amygdala/Physiology
  • Animals
  • Bombesin/Pharmacology
  • Brain Stem/Physiology
  • Conditioning (Psychology)
  • Fear/Physiology
  • Female
  • Gaba-A Receptor Agonists/Pharmacology
  • Heart Rate/Drug Effects
  • Hypothalamus/Physiology
  • Male
  • Muscimol/Pharmacology
  • Neural Inhibition
  • Neural Pathways/Physiology
  • Neurons/Physiology
  • Oxytocin/Agonists
  • Oxytocin/Analogs & Derivatives
  • Patch-Clamp Techniques
  • Periaqueductal Gray/Physiology
  • Rats
  • Rats
  • Sprague-Dawley
Disciplines
  • Biology
  • Medicine

Abstract

Central amygdala (CeA) projections to hypothalamic and brain stem nuclei regulate the behavioral and physiological expression of fear, but it is unknown whether these different aspects of the fear response can be separately regulated by the CeA. We combined fluorescent retrograde tracing of CeA projections to nuclei that modulate fear-related freezing or cardiovascular responses with in vitro electrophysiological recordings and with in vivo monitoring of related behavioral and physiological parameters. CeA projections emerged from separate neuronal populations with different electrophysiological characteristics and different response properties to oxytocin. In vivo, oxytocin decreased freezing responses in fear-conditioned rats without affecting the cardiovascular response. Thus, neuropeptidergic signaling can modulate the CeA outputs through separate neuronal circuits and thereby individually steer the various aspects of the fear response.

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