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Selenium and Selenoproteins in Adipose Tissue Physiology and Obesity.

Authors
  • Tinkov, Alexey A1, 2
  • Ajsuvakova, Olga P1, 3
  • Filippini, Tommaso4
  • Zhou, Ji-Chang5
  • Lei, Xin Gen6
  • Gatiatulina, Eugenia R7
  • Michalke, Bernhard8
  • Skalnaya, Margarita G2
  • Vinceti, Marco4
  • Aschner, Michael2, 9
  • Skalny, Anatoly V1, 2
  • 1 Yaroslavl State University, 150003 Yaroslavl, Russia.
  • 2 IM Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (Sechenov University), 119146 Moscow, Russia.
  • 3 Federal Research Centre of Biological Systems and Agro-Technologies of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 460000 Orenburg, Russia.
  • 4 CREAGEN, Environmental, Genetic and Nutritional Epidemiology Research Center, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 41121 Modena, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 5 School of Public Health (Shenzhen), Sun Yat-sen University, Shenzhen 518100, China. , (China)
  • 6 Department of Animal Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.
  • 7 All-Russian Research Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants (VILAR), 117216 Moscow, Russia.
  • 8 Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 9 Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Biomolecules
Publisher
MDPI AG
Publication Date
Apr 24, 2020
Volume
10
Issue
4
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/biom10040658
PMID: 32344656
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Selenium (Se) homeostasis is tightly related to carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, but its possible roles in obesity development and in adipocyte metabolism are unclear. The objective of the present study is to review the current data on Se status in obesity and to discuss the interference between Se and selenoprotein metabolism in adipocyte physiology and obesity pathogenesis. The overview and meta-analysis of the studies on blood Se and selenoprotein P (SELENOP) levels, as well as glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity in obese subjects, have yielded heterogenous and even conflicting results. Laboratory studies demonstrate that Se may modulate preadipocyte proliferation and adipogenic differentiation, and also interfere with insulin signaling, and regulate lipolysis. Knockout models have demonstrated that the selenoprotein machinery, including endoplasmic reticulum-resident selenoproteins together with GPXs and thioredoxin reductases (TXNRDs), are tightly related to adipocyte development and functioning. In conclusion, Se and selenoproteins appear to play an essential role in adipose tissue physiology, although human data are inconsistent. Taken together, these findings do not support the utility of Se supplementation to prevent or alleviate obesity in humans. Further human and laboratory studies are required to elucidate associations between Se metabolism and obesity.

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