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Cytogenetic characteristics of oral squamous cell carcinomas in Fanconi anemia

Authors
  • Hermsen, Mario A. J. A.1
  • Xie, Yan2
  • Rooimans, Martin A.2
  • Meijer, Gerrit A.1
  • Baak, Jan P. A.1
  • Plukker, John Th. M.3
  • Arwert, Fré2
  • Joenje, Hans2
  • 1 Free University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands , Amsterdam
  • 2 Free University Medical Center, Department of Clinical Genetics and Human Genetics, Amsterdam, The Netherlands , Amsterdam
  • 3 University Hospital, Department of Oncological Surgery, Groningen, The Netherlands , Groningen
Type
Published Article
Journal
Familial Cancer
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2001
Volume
1
Issue
1
Pages
39–43
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1023/A:1011528310346
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive syndrome with a marked predisposition to malignancies, in particular acute myeloid leukemia and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. We examined oral squamous cell carcinoma tissue from two FA patients (FA-A and FA-C) by comparative genomic hybridization. Both tumors, which were negative for human papilloma as well as Epstein-Barr viral sequences, showed multiple alterations with a high proportion of whole-arm chromosomal gains and losses. This combination of features as well as the sites involved in chromosomal breakage are very similar to what is typically observed in non-FA oral tumors. These results suggest that the process leading to early occurrence of oral cancer in FA patients follows a similar pathway as in non-FA cancer patients, which would support a caretaker function for FA genes in the protection against oral carcinogenesis. Since FA patients are uniquely hypersensitive to DNA cross-linking agents, while oral cancer in the general population is thought to be environmentally induced, these results also suggest that environmental DNA cross-linkers may be causally involved in oral carcinogenesis.

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