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Cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors and the kidney.

Authors
  • Breyer, M D
  • Hao, C
  • Qi, Z
Type
Published Article
Journal
Current Opinion in Critical Care
Publisher
Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer) - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2001
Volume
7
Issue
6
Pages
393–400
Identifiers
PMID: 11805541
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Cyclooxygenases (COX) are the target of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) which exert their therapeutic effect by blocking COX's capacity to metabolize arachidonate to a series of biologically active fatty acids, designated prostaglandins. NSAID use is associated with two major tonicities: gastrointestinal bleeding and renal dysfunction. In the setting of significant physiologic stress, renal function becomes dependent upon prostaglandins and NSAID use may be associated with acute deterioration of renal function, including development of sodium retention, edema, hypertension, hyperkalemia, and or papillary necrosis. Two isoforms, COX1 and COX2, have been identified. They are products of distinct genes and their expression is under different regulatory control. Both COX1 and COX2 are highly expressed in the kidney and both are inhibited by conventional NSAIDs. Accumulating data using recently developed selective COX2 inhibitors suggest that while these agents spare the gastrointestinal tract they have similar renal effects as non-selective NSAIDs. Therefore, caution should be taken when prescribing selective COX2 inhibitor to patients, especially to patients with predisposed physiologic stress.

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