Affordable Access

Current status and future opportunities for controlling acromegaly.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Pituitary
Publication Date
Volume
5
Issue
3
Pages
185–196
Identifiers
PMID: 12812311
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Growth-hormone (GH) secreting adenomas, including acromegaly, account for approximately one-sixth of all pituitary adenomas and are associated with mortality rates at least twice that of the general population. The ultimate goal of therapy for acromegaly is normalization of morbidity and mortality rates achieved through removal or reduction of the tumor mass and normalization of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels. Previously published efficacy results of current treatment modalities (surgery, conventional radiation, and medical therapy with dopamine agonists and somatostatin analogs) are often difficult to compare because of the different criteria used to define cure (some of which are now considered inadequate). For each of these modalities, pooled data from a series of acromegaly studies were reviewed for rates of IGF-I normalization, a currently accepted definition of cure. The results showed overall cure rates of approximately 10% for bromocriptine, 34% for cabergoline, 36% for conventional radiation, 50-90% for surgery for microadenomas and less than 50% for macroadenomas, and 54-66% for octreotide. These cure rates based on IGF-I normalization are generally less than those reported for cure based solely on GH levels. Novel new therapies for acromegaly include the somatostatin analog, lanreotide, Gamma Knife radiosurgery, and pegvisomant, the first in its class of new GH receptor antagonists. Although it does not appear that Gamma Knife radiosurgery results in significantly higher cure rates or fewer complications, it does provide a notable improvement in delivery compared with conventional radiation. Early studies have reported IGF-I normalization in 48% of lanreotide-treated patients and up to 97% of pegvisomant-treated.

Statistics

Seen <100 times