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A Cultural Perspective on Functional Limitations and Well-Being.

Authors
  • Choi, Jeong Ha1
  • Miyamoto, Yuri1
  • Ryff, Carol D1
  • 1 University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Personality & social psychology bulletin
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2020
Volume
46
Issue
9
Pages
1378–1391
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/0146167220905712
PMID: 32065030
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Functional limitations-difficulty in carrying out activities of daily living-have been linked to poorer well-being in Western cultures. This might be partly due to the lower personal control associated with functional limitations. However, compared with the West, in Asian cultural contexts (e.g., Japan) where agency and control are based less predominantly on individual attributes, the link between functional limitations and well-being may be weaker. Using cross-sectional probability samples from the United States and Japan (Study 1), functional limitations were associated with lower well-being in both cultures, though the association was weaker in Japan than in the United States and personal control played a mediating role. Furthermore, analyses of longitudinal data (Study 2) showed the cross-cultural patterns generally consistent with the cross-sectional analyses of Study 1, though the cultural moderation was found for fewer well-being measures. Such findings enrich our understanding of how health status and well-being are related across cultures.

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