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Cuba and the Bucharest Conference.

Authors
  • Sanders, T G
Type
Published Article
Journal
American Universities Field Staff reports: North America
Publication Date
Dec 01, 1974
Volume
2
Issue
4
Pages
1–11
Identifiers
PMID: 12307113
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Cuba has been able to institutionalize its population policy and may influence policies and programs elsewhere in the Third World. The government of Cuba has a policy of planned development, but does not concentrate on increasing or reducing population. Rather, development is stimulated and fertility allowed to find its own level. Cuba is characterized by intermediate demographic indices when compared with the rest of Latin America, with a growth rate higher than Argentina and Urug uay but lower than most of the region's other countries. Even before the Revolution, fertility and mortality rates placed Cuba among the more developed countreis in Latin America. Both natality and mortality rates have declined since 1960. This is due to the institution of a good quality health care system. A moderate increase in growth rate is expected after 1975 when out-migration will decrease. The Cuban demographic transition has been favored by various factors: 1)a political system which organized social and economic change in the country; 2)a favorable demographic situation; and 3)massive financial, expert, and technical aid from other Communist countries. Cuba and othe r Communist countries maintained at Bucharest that population problems were not responsible for other economic and social problems in a country. Cuba seems to have concentrated on the underlying problems and left the matter of family planning to individual motivation.

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