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Crosstalk Between Mast Cells and Adipocytes in Physiologic and Pathologic Conditions.

Authors
  • Elieh Ali Komi, Daniel1, 2
  • Shafaghat, Farzaneh1, 2
  • Christian, Mark3
  • 1 Immunology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. , (Iran)
  • 2 Department of Immunology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. , (Iran)
  • 3 School of Science and Technology, Nottingham, NG11 8NS, UK. [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Clinical Reviews in Allergy & Immunology
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2020
Volume
58
Issue
3
Pages
388–400
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s12016-020-08785-7
PMID: 32215785
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Excessive fatty acids and glucose uptake support the infiltration of adipose tissue (AT) by a variety of immune cells including neutrophils, pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages, and mast cells (MCs). These cells promote inflammation by releasing pro-inflammatory mediators. The involvement of MCs in AT biology is supported by their accumulation in the AT of obese individuals along with significantly higher serum levels of MC-derived tryptase. AT-resident MCs under the influence of locally derived adipokines such as leptin become activated and release pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNFα that worsens the inflammatory state. MCs support angiogenesis in AT by releasing chymase and inducing preadipocyte differentiation and also the proliferation of adipocytes through 15-deoxy-delta PGJ2/PPARγ interaction. Additionally, they contribute to the remodeling of the AT extracellular matrix (ECM) and play a role in the recruitment and activation of leukocytes. MC degranulation has been linked to brown adipocyte activation, and evidence indicates an important link between MCs and the appearance of BRITE/beige adipocytes in white AT. Cell crosstalk between MCs and AT-resident cells, mainly adipocytes and immune cells, shows that these cells play a critical role in the regulation of AT homeostasis and inflammation.

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