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Craniofacial-deafness-hand syndrome revisited.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
American journal of medical genetics. Part A
Publication Date
Volume
123A
Issue
1
Pages
91–94
Identifiers
PMID: 14556253
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

In 1983 Sommer described a new syndrome in a mother and her infant daughter which was subsequently called the syndrome of craniofacial, hand anomalies and sensorineural deafness. The syndrome consisted of a normal calvarium with a flat facial profile, hypertelorism and small palpebral fissures with an antimongoloid slant, a depressed nasal bridge with a button tip and slitlike nares and a small "pursed" mouth. Profound sensorineural hearing loss and ulnar deviation of the hands with flexion contractures of digits three, four and five was evident. The family had another child, a son, two years after the birth of the index case that had the exact manifestations as his mother and sister. Because of three affected family members in two generations and a phenotype of midfacial anomalies and dystopia canthorum resembling Waardenburg syndrome, a search for mutations in the PAX3 gene was undertaken. A missense mutation in the paired domain of PAX3 (Asn47Lys) was detected. We have provided a 20-year follow-up of a syndrome characterized by craniofacial anomalies, hearing loss and hand deformities and which is caused by a PAX3 missense mutation.

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