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[Coxsackie B virus infections in cardiology. Apropos of 66 cases].

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Pathologie Biologie
0369-8114
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
35
Issue
4
Pages
347–352
Identifiers
PMID: 3035466
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Coxsackie B virus infections are common and frequently asymptomatic. However in young people, they can cause primary congestive cardiomyopathy and complicate previous cardiovascular illnesses. Virus diagnosis is difficult and based mainly on the detection of significant rising or stating high neutralizing antibody titers. A clinical and epidemiological five years study investigated 3,856 sera. 30.2% of the patients had evidence of a significant antibody titer (greater than or equal to 64) to one of the group B Coxsackie viruses; this percentage reaches 34.6% in cardiology and fluctuates from year to year; Coxsackie B2 is predominant (55.9%) in cardiology; coxsackie B1 and B2 antibody responses were detected more frequently than B3, B4 and B5. Coxsackie B6 appears to be uncommon. From these, 66 patients have evidence of coxsackie B virus infections with 60.2% for Coxsackie B2; they include pericarditis (30.3%), acute and chronic congestive cardiomyopathies (19.7%). Moreover it has been suggested that Coxsackie B virus might be responsible for electrocardiographic abnormalities (9.1%), ischemic heart disease and myocardial infarction. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and radioimmunoassay with purified antigens (VP1 and VP4) did not appear better than microneutralisation for evaluation of IgM and IgG antibodies. To elucidate the mechanisms of cardiac injury it is refer to viral replication, virus specific and auto-reactive T cells cytotoxic activities.

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