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Improving the Health Benefits of Snap Bean: Genome-Wide Association Studies of Total Phenolic Content.

Authors
  • Myers, James R1
  • Wallace, Lyle T2
  • Mafi Moghaddam, Samira3
  • Kleintop, Adrienne E4
  • Echeverria, Dimas5
  • Thompson, Henry J6
  • Brick, Mark A7
  • Lee, Rian8
  • McClean, Phillip E9
  • 1 Department of Horticulture, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA. [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Horticulture, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA. [email protected]
  • 3 Plant Resilience Institute, Department of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA. [email protected]
  • 4 Department of Plant Science, Delaware Valley University, Doylestown, PA 18901, USA. [email protected]
  • 5 RNA Therapeutics Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA. [email protected]
  • 6 Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. [email protected]
  • 7 Department of Soil and Crop Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. [email protected]
  • 8 Department of Plant Science, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58105, USA. [email protected]
  • 9 Department of Plant Science, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58105, USA. [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Nutrients
Publisher
MDPI AG
Publication Date
Oct 18, 2019
Volume
11
Issue
10
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/nu11102509
PMID: 31635241
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Snap beans are a significant source of micronutrients in the human diet. Among the micronutrients present in snap beans are phenolic compounds with known beneficial effects on human health, potentially via their metabolism by the gut-associated microbiome. The genetic pathways leading to the production of phenolics in snap bean pods remain uncertain. In this study, we quantified the level of total phenolic content (TPC) in the Bean Coordinated Agriculture Program (CAP) snap bean diversity panel of 149 accessions. The panel was characterized spectrophotometrically for phenolic content with a Folin-Ciocalteu colorimetric assay. Flower, seed and pod color were also quantified, as red, purple, yellow and brown colors are associated with anthocyanins and flavonols in common bean. Genotyping was performed through an Illumina Infinium Genechip BARCBEAN6K_3 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) analysis identified 11 quantitative trait nucleotides (QTN) associated with TPC. An SNP was identified for TPC on Pv07 located near the P gene, which is a major switch in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. Candidate genes were identified for seven of the 11 TPC QTN. Five regulatory genes were identified and represent novel sources of variation for exploitation in developing snap beans with higher phenolic levels for greater health benefits to the consumer.

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