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COVID-19 Resulted in Lower Grades for Male High School Students and Students With ADHD.

Authors
  • Breaux, Rosanna1
  • Dunn, Nicholas C1
  • Langberg, Joshua M2
  • Cusick, Caroline N2
  • Dvorsky, Melissa R3, 4
  • Becker, Stephen P5, 6
  • 1 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, USA.
  • 2 Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, USA.
  • 3 Children's National Hospital, Washington, DC, USA.
  • 4 The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, DC, USA.
  • 5 Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, OH, USA.
  • 6 University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, OH, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Attention Disorders
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
May 01, 2022
Volume
26
Issue
7
Pages
1011–1017
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/10870547211044211
PMID: 34696611
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Researchers have speculated that the COVID-19 pandemic may expand the academic performance gap experienced by at-risk students. We examined learning experiences during the 2020 to 2021 school year and the impact the pandemic has had on high school student grade point average (GPA), including predictors of change in GPA from 2019-2020 to 2020-2021. Participants were 238 adolescents (55.5% male), 49.6% with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), in the United States. Adolescents reported on their GPAs via online surveys. GPA significantly decreased on average from 2019-2020 to 2020-2021 school year. ADHD status and biological sex significantly moderated change-students with ADHD and male students reported decreased GPA, whereas students without ADHD and female students' GPA did not change. Low income and Black/Latinx students had lower GPAs in both school years. It is imperative that additional supports be provided for at-risk students to help them catch up on missed learning during the pandemic.

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