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Coronavirus Disease 2019 and Antimicrobial Resistance: Parallel and Interacting Health Emergencies.

Authors
  • Nieuwlaat, Robby1
  • Mbuagbaw, Lawrence1, 2
  • Mertz, Dominik1, 3
  • Burrows, Lori L4, 5
  • Bowdish, Dawn M E6
  • Moja, Lorenzo7
  • Wright, Gerard D5
  • Schünemann, Holger J1, 8
  • 1 Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 2 Biostatistics Unit, Father Sean O'Sullivan Research Centre, St Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 3 Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 4 Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 5 Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 6 Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 7 Department of Health Product Policy and Standards, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. , (Switzerland)
  • 8 Michael G. DeGroote Cochrane Canada Centre, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Clinical Infectious Diseases
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
May 04, 2021
Volume
72
Issue
9
Pages
1657–1659
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/cid/ciaa773
PMID: 32544232
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) are parallel and interacting health emergencies that provide the opportunity for mutual learning. As their measures and consequences are comparable, the COVID-19 pandemic helps to illustrate the potential long-term impact of AMR, which is less acute but not less crucial. They may also impact each other as there is a push to use existing antimicrobials to treat critically ill COVID-19 patients in the absence of specific treatments. Attempts to manage the spread of COVID-19 may also lead to a slowdown in AMR. Understanding how COVID-19 affects AMR trends and what we can expect if these trends remain the same or worsen will help us to plan the next steps for tackling AMR. Researchers should start collecting data to measure the impact of current COVID-19 policies and programs on AMR. © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: [email protected]

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