Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

The costs of racism for marriage: how racial discrimination hurts, and ethnic identity protects, newlywed marriages among Latinos.

Authors
  • Trail, Thomas E
  • Goff, Phillip Atiba
  • Bradbury, Thomas N
  • Karney, Benjamin R
Type
Published Article
Journal
Personality & social psychology bulletin
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2012
Volume
38
Issue
4
Pages
454–465
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/0146167211429450
PMID: 22109252
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The experience of racial or ethnic discrimination is a salient and severe stressor that has been linked to numerous disparities in important outcomes. Yet, the link between perceived discrimination and marital outcomes has been overlooked by research on relationship stressors. The current study examined this link and tested whether ethnic identity buffered the relation between discrimination and ratings of marital quality and verbal aggression. A sample of 330 Latino newlyweds completed measures of perceived discrimination, ethnic identity, spouse's verbal aggression, and marital quality. Each spouse's interviewer also independently rated marital quality. Dyadic analyses revealed that husbands' experience of discrimination negatively predicted wives' marital quality, but only for husbands with weak ethnic identity. Wives whose husbands had strong ethnic identity were buffered from this effect. Identity also buffered the relation between husbands' discrimination and verbal aggression toward their wives, and this effect mediated the association between discrimination, identity, and marital quality.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times