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Costs of Medically Attended Acute Gastrointestinal Infections: The Polish Prospective Healthcare Utilization Survey.

Authors
  • Czech, Marcin1
  • Rosinska, Magdalena2
  • Rogalska, Justyna2
  • Staszewska, Ewa2
  • Stefanoff, Pawel2
  • 1 Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacoeconomics, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Poland)
  • 2 Department of Epidemiology, National Institute of Public Health-National Institute of Hygiene, Warsaw, Poland. , (Poland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Value in health regional issues
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2013
Volume
2
Issue
2
Pages
210–217
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.vhri.2013.06.011
PMID: 29702867
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The burden of acute gastrointestinal infections (AGIs) on the society has not been well studied in Central European countries, which prevents the implementation of effective, targeted public health interventions. We investigated patients of 11 randomly selected general practices and 8 hospital units. Each patient meeting the international AGI case definition criteria was interviewed on costs incurred related to the use of health care resources. Follow-up interview with consenting patients was conducted 2 to 4 weeks after the general practitioner (GP) visit or discharge from hospital, collecting information on self-medication costs and indirect costs. Costs were recalculated to US dollars by using the purchasing power parity exchange rate for Poland. Weighting the inpatient costs by age-specific probability of hospital referral by GPs, the societal cost of a medically attended AGI case was estimated to be US $168. The main cost drivers of direct medical costs were cost of hospital bed days (US $28), cost of outpatient pharmacotherapy (US $20), and cost of GP consultation (US $10). Patients covered only the cost of outpatient pharmacotherapy. Considering the AGI population GP consultation rate, the age-adjusted societal cost of medically attended AGI episodes was estimated at US $2222 million, of which 53% was attributable to indirect costs. Even though AGIs generate a low cost for individuals, they place a high burden on the society, attributed mostly to indirect costs. Higher resources could be allocated to the prevention and control of AGIs. Copyright © 2013, International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc.

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