Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Soil Nitrate Nitrogen Content and Grain Yields of Organically Grown Cereals as Affected by a Strip Tillage and Forage Legume Intercropping.

Authors
  • Arlauskienė, Aušra1
  • Gecaitė, Viktorija1
  • Toleikienė, Monika2
  • Šarūnaitė, Lina2
  • Kadžiulienė, Žydrė2
  • 1 Joniškelis Experimental Station, Lithuanian Research Centre for Agriculture and Forestry, Joniškėlis, LT-39301 Pasvalys, Lithuania. , (Lithuania)
  • 2 Lithuanian Research Centre for Agriculture and Forestry, Institute of Agriculture, Instituto al. 1, Akademija, LT-58344 Kėdainiai, Lithuania. , (Lithuania)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Plants
Publisher
MDPI AG
Publication Date
Jul 15, 2021
Volume
10
Issue
7
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/plants10071453
PMID: 34371654
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Reducing tillage intensity and increasing crop diversity by including perennial legumes is an agrotechnical practice that strongly affects the soil environment. Strip tillage may be beneficial in the forage legume-cereals intercropping system due to more efficient utilization of biological nitrogen. Field experiments were conducted on a clay loam Cambisol to determine the effect of forage legume-winter wheat strip tillage intercropping on soil nitrate nitrogen (N-NO3) content and cereal productivity in various sequences of rotation in organic production systems. Forage legumes (Medicago lupulina L., Trifolium repens L., T. alexandrinum L.) grown in pure and forage legume-winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) strip tillage intercrops were studied. Conventional deep inversion tillage was compared to strip tillage. Nitrogen supply to winter wheat was assessed by the change in soil nitrate nitrogen content (N-NO3) and total N accumulation in yield (grain and straw). Conventional tillage was found to significantly increase N-NO3 content while cultivating winter wheat after forage legumes in late autumn (0-30 cm layer), after growth resumption in spring (30-60 cm), and in autumn after harvesting (30-60 cm). Soil N-NO3 content did not differ significantly between winter wheat strip sown in perennial legumes or oat stubble. Winter wheat grain yields increased with increasing N-NO3 content in soil. The grain yield was not significantly different when comparing winter wheat-forage legume strip intercropping (without mulching) to strip sowing in oat stubble. In forage legume-winter wheat strip intercropping, N release from legumes was weak and did not meet wheat nitrogen requirements.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times