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Corticostriatal plasticity, neuronal ensembles, and regulation of drug-seeking behavior.

Authors
  • Bobadilla, Ana-Clara1
  • Heinsbroek, Jasper A1
  • Gipson, Cassandra D2
  • Griffin, William C1
  • Fowler, Christie D3
  • Kenny, Paul J4
  • Kalivas, Peter W5
  • 1 Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States. , (United States)
  • 2 Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, United States. , (United States)
  • 3 University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, United States. , (United States)
  • 4 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Icahn, New York, NY, United States. , (United States)
  • 5 Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2017
Volume
235
Pages
93–112
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/bs.pbr.2017.07.013
PMID: 29054293
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

The idea that interconnected neuronal ensembles code for specific behaviors has been around for decades; however, recent technical improvements allow studying these networks and their causal role in initiating and maintaining behavior. In particular, the role of ensembles in drug-seeking behaviors in the context of addiction is being actively investigated. Concurrent with breakthroughs in quantifying ensembles, research has identified a role for synaptic glutamate spillover during relapse. In particular, the transient relapse-associated changes in glutamatergic synapses on accumbens neurons, as well as in adjacent astroglia and extracellular matrix, are key elements of the synaptic plasticity encoded by drug use and the metaplasticity induced by drug-associated cues that precipitate drug-seeking behaviors. Here, we briefly review the recent discoveries related to ensembles in the addiction field and then endeavor to link these discoveries with drug-induced striatal plasticity and cue-induced metaplasticity toward deeper neurobiological understandings of drug seeking.

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