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Corrole photochemistry

Authors
  • Lemon, Christopher M.1
  • 1 California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences (QB3), University of California, Berkeley, USA , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Pure and Applied Chemistry
Publisher
Walter de Gruyter GmbH
Publication Date
Sep 28, 2020
Volume
92
Issue
12
Pages
1901–1919
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1515/pac-2020-0703
Source
De Gruyter
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

The rapid expansion of photoredox catalysis and artificial photosynthesis has garnered renewed interest in the field of photochemistry. While porphyrins have been widely utilized for a variety of photochemical applications, corrole photochemistry remains underexplored, despite an exponential growth in corrole chemistry. Indeed, less than 4% of all corrole-related publications have studied the photochemistry of these molecules. Since corroles exhibit chemical properties that are distinct from porphyrins and related macrocycles, it is likely that this divergence would also be observed in their photochemical properties. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the extant corrole photochemistry literature. Corroles primarily serve as photosensitizers that transfer energy or an electron to molecular oxygen to form singlet oxygen or superoxide, respectively. While both of these reactive oxygen species can be used to drive chemical reactions, they can also be exploited for photodynamic therapy to treat cancer and other diseases. Although direct photochemical activation of metal–ligand bonds has been less explored, corroles mediate a variety of transformations, particularly oxygen atom transfer reactions. Together, these examples illustrate the diversity of corrole photochemistry and suggest that there are many additional applications yet to be discovered.

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