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Corrigendum to Streicker et al. (2013) Differential sources of host species heterogeneity influence the transmission and control of multi-host parasites.

Authors
  • Streicker, Daniel G1, 2
  • Fenton, Andy3
  • Pedersen, Amy B4
  • 1 Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health, and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ, UK.
  • 2 MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, G61 1QH, UK.
  • 3 Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Crown Street, Liverpool, L69 7ZB, UK.
  • 4 Centre for Infection, Immunity and Evolution & Institute of Evolutionary Biology, School of Biological Science, University of Edinburgh, Kings Buildings Ashworth Labs, Edinburgh, EH9 3JT, UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Ecology Letters
Publisher
Wiley (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2015
Volume
18
Issue
10
Pages
1134–1137
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/ele.12477
PMID: 26346689
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

In a recent article, we described a conceptual and analytical model to identify the key host species for parasite transmission in multi-host communities and used data from 11 gastro-intestinal parasites infecting up to five small mammal host species as an illustrative example of how the framework could be applied. A limitation of these empirical data was uncertainty in the identification of parasite species using egg/oocyst morphology, which could overestimate parasite sharing between host species. Here, we show that the key results of the original analysis, namely that (1) parasites naturally infect multiple host species, but typically rely on a small subset of infected host species for long-term maintenance, (2) that different mechanisms underlie how particular host species dominate transmission and (3) that these different mechanisms influence the predicted efficiency of disease control measures, are robust to analysis of a smaller subset of host-parasite combinations that we have greatest confidence in identifying. We further comment briefly on the need for accurate parasite identification, ideally using molecular techniques to quantify cross-species transmission and differentiate covert host specificity from true host generalism.

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