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Correlative single-molecule fluorescence barcoding of gene regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Authors
  • Shashkova, Sviatlana1
  • Nyström, Thomas2
  • Leake, Mark C3
  • Wollman, Adam J M4
  • 1 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute for Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Sweden)
  • 2 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute for Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Sweden)
  • 3 Department of Physics, University of York, YO10 5DD, York, United Kingdom. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United Kingdom)
  • 4 Newcastle University Biosciences Institute, Newcastle NE2 4HH, United Kingdom. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United Kingdom)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Methods
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Oct 18, 2020
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.ymeth.2020.10.009
PMID: 33086048
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Most cells adapt to their environment by switching combinations of genes on and off through a complex interplay of transcription factor proteins (TFs). The mechanisms by which TFs respond to signals, move into the nucleus and find specific binding sites in target genes is still largely unknown. Single-molecule fluorescence microscopes, which can image single TFs in live cells, have begun to elucidate the problem. Here, we show that different environmental signals, in this case carbon sources, yield a unique single-molecule fluorescence pattern of foci of a key metabolic regulating transcription factor, Mig1, in the nucleus of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This pattern serves as a 'barcode' of the gene regulatory state of the cells which can be correlated with cell growth characteristics and other biological function. Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier Inc.

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