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Correlates of Safety Strategy Use Among South African Women Living With HIV and at Risk of Intimate Partner Violence.

Authors
  • Brown, Leslie Lauren1, 2
  • Perkins, Jessica Mayson3, 4
  • Hargrove, Jami Lynn2
  • Pahl, Kathryn Elenor5
  • Mogoba, Phepo6
  • van Zyl, Michiel Adriaan7
  • 1 Meharry Medical College, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA.
  • 2 Nashville CARES, Nashville, TN, USA.
  • 3 Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA.
  • 4 Vanderbilt Institute of Global HealthUniversity, Nashville, TN, USA.
  • 5 Shout-it-Now, Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa. , (South Africa)
  • 6 University of Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa. , (South Africa)
  • 7 University of South Florida, Tampa, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Violence against women
Publication Date
May 01, 2022
Volume
28
Issue
6-7
Pages
1505–1522
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/10778012211021108
PMID: 34157908
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Intimate partner violence (IPV) and HIV are correlated and endemic in South Africa. However, safety strategy use to prevent IPV among HIV-positive women is understudied. This study assesses correlates of specific safety strategy use among 166 Black South African women recently experiencing IPV and testing positive for HIV. Associations were observed between consultation with formal (i.e., counselors, clergy, IPV specialists) and informal networks (i.e., friends/family) and participant language (isiZulu, isiXhosa, Sesotho, and English), past year IPV, and engaging in HIV care. Future HIV-IPV programs should consider how characteristics of different IPV safety strategies may influence strategy uptake and ultimately HIV care.

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