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Correlates of Men's Bystander Intervention to Prevent Sexual and Relationship Violence: The Role of Masculine Discrepancy Stress.

Authors
  • Berke, Danielle S1, 2
  • Leone, Ruschelle M3, 4
  • Hyatt, Courtland S5
  • Zeichner, Amos5
  • Parrott, Dominic J3
  • 1 Hunter College, The City University of New York, New York City, USA.
  • 2 The Graduate Center, The City University of New York, New York City, USA.
  • 3 Georgia State University, Atlanta, USA. , (Georgia)
  • 4 Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, USA.
  • 5 University of Georgia, Athens, USA. , (Georgia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of interpersonal violence
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2021
Volume
36
Issue
21-22
Pages
9877–9903
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/0886260519880999
PMID: 31608781
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Extant literature suggests that men may be less likely than women to engage in prosocial bystander behavior to interrupt sexual and relationship violence. However, there has been little consideration of the influence of masculine gender role discrepancy and masculine discrepancy stress (i.e., stress that occurs when men perceive themselves as falling short of traditional gender norms) on men's bystander beliefs and behaviors. The current study fills an important gap in the literature by assessing the influence of masculine gender role discrepancy and masculine discrepancy stress on a range of prosocial bystander behaviors through their influence on the bystander decision-making process. Participants were 356 undergraduate men recruited from two different Southeastern U.S. universities who completed online surveys assessing self-perceptions of gender role discrepancy, consequent discrepancy stress, bystander decision-making, and bystander behavior in sexual and relationship violence contexts. Path models indicated significant conditional indirect effects of masculine gender role discrepancy on proactive bystander behaviors (i.e., behaviors related to making a plan in advance of being in a risky situation) and bystander behavior in drinking situations across levels of masculine discrepancy stress. Specifically, men who believed that they are less masculine than the typical man reported more pros to intervention in sexual and relationship violence than cons, and thus reported intervening more, but only if they were high in masculine discrepancy stress. Findings suggest that bystander intervention programs should explicitly address and challenge rigid expectations of what it means to be "manly" to transform gender expectations perpetuating sexual and relationship violence.

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