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Correlates of e-cigarette use among adults initiating smoking cessation treatment.

Authors
  • Boozary, Laili Kharazi1
  • Frank-Pearce, Summer G2
  • Alexander, Adam C3
  • Waring, Joseph J C4
  • Ehlke, Sarah J4
  • Businelle, Michael S3
  • Cohn, Amy M5
  • Kendzor, Darla E6
  • 1 Department of Psychology, Cellular and Behavioral Neurobiology, The University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, United States; TSET Health Promotion Research Center, Stephenson Cancer Center, The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, United States. , (United States)
  • 2 Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Hudson College of Public Health, The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, United States; TSET Health Promotion Research Center, Stephenson Cancer Center, The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, United States. , (United States)
  • 3 Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, United States; TSET Health Promotion Research Center, Stephenson Cancer Center, The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, United States. , (United States)
  • 4 TSET Health Promotion Research Center, Stephenson Cancer Center, The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, United States. , (United States)
  • 5 TSET Health Promotion Research Center, Stephenson Cancer Center, The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, United States; Department of Pediatrics, The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, United States. , (United States)
  • 6 Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, United States; TSET Health Promotion Research Center, Stephenson Cancer Center, The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, United States. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Drug and alcohol dependence
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2021
Volume
224
Pages
108724–108724
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2021.108724
PMID: 33940324
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Little is known about the correlates of e-cigarette (EC) use among adults seeking smoking cessation treatment, and it is unclear how EC use affects smoking treatment outcomes. Participants were 649 adult smokers enrolled in smoking cessation treatment. Participants completed a baseline (pre-quit) assessment with follow-up at 4-, 12-, and 26-weeks after a scheduled combustible cigarette (CC) cessation date. EC use was described before and after the CC cessation date, and the impact of baseline EC use on CC cessation at follow-up was evaluated. At baseline, 66.6 % of participants had ever-used ECs and 23.1 % reported past 30-day EC use. Past 30-day EC users were younger, more socioeconomically disadvantaged, more CC dependent, and less likely to report Black race compared to non-users. At the 4-, 12-, and 26-week follow-ups, 6.4 %, 7.4 %, and 8.1 % reported dual EC/CC use; and 2.7 %, 3.4 %, and 2.7 % had switched to exclusive EC use. Past 30-day EC use at baseline was not associated with CC cessation at any follow-up. However, among baseline past 30-day EC users (n = 150), using ECs ≥ once per week was associated with a lower likelihood of CC cessation at 26-week follow-up (adjusted OR 0.346, 95 % CI: 0.120, 0.997). Findings indicated that dual users of CCs and ECs at baseline differed from CC-only users on sociodemographic and smoking characteristics. Baseline EC use did not impact smoking cessation overall. However, among past 30-day users, more frequent EC use at baseline adversely impacted longer-term cessation outcomes, perhaps due to greater baseline CC/nicotine dependence. Copyright © 2021 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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