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Copper Speciation in Soil: Time Evolution and Effect of Clay Amendment

Authors
  • Montenegro, Andrea C.1, 2
  • Ferreyroa, Gisele V.1
  • Parolo, María E.3
  • Tudino, Mabel B.1
  • Lavado, Raúl S.2
  • Molina, Fernando V.1
  • 1 Universidad de Buenos Aires, Instituto de Química Física de Materiales, Ambiente y Energía (INQUIMAE), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II, piso 1, Buenos Aires, C1428EHA, Argentina , Buenos Aires (Argentina)
  • 2 Universidad de Buenos Aires, Instituto de Investigaciones en Biociencias Agrícolas y Ambientales (INBA), Facultad de Agronomía, Buenos Aires, Argentina , Buenos Aires (Argentina)
  • 3 Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Instituto de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ingeniería de Procesos, Biotecnología y Energías Alternativas, PROBIEN (CONICET-UNCo) y Facultad de Ingeniería, Buenos Aires 1400, Neuquén, 8300, Argentina , Buenos Aires 1400 (Argentina)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Water Air & Soil Pollution
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Aug 13, 2015
Volume
226
Issue
9
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11270-015-2569-1
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
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Abstract

Copper bioavailability, specially to plants, is strongly dependent on its chemical form, as for most metals. Copper-contaminated soil can be treated in situ by the addition of minerals such as Na-bentonite, which mixed with surface soil, can transform this pollutant to non-bioavailable forms. In this work, shelter experiments were conducted to study the time evolution of Cu speciation, in pristine soil as well as in amended one. A selective sequential extraction method was employed to determine the metal speciation in the samples. The results show that the major metal fraction is the organic matter-bound one, whereas the exchangeable fraction is very low, even the first day after Cu addition. The time evolution shows a slow decrease of the organic-bound Cu and a corresponding increase of the most stable mineral fractions. With the addition of Na-bentonite to copper-contaminated soil, the most stable mineral fractions increase whereas the organic-bound one decreases, showing essentially similar time dependence of the several metal fractions. Sodium bentonite could be effectively used for remediation of soils polluted with Cu.

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