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The coordination between actin filaments and adhesion in mesenchymal migration.

Authors
  • O'Neill, Geraldine M
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cell Adhesion & Migration
Publisher
Landes Bioscience
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2009
Volume
3
Issue
4
Pages
355–357
Identifiers
PMID: 19684475
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Mesenchymal cell motility is characterized by a polarized distribution of actin filaments, with a network of short branched actin filaments at the leading edge, and polymers of actin filaments arranged into distinct classes of actin stress fibers behind the leading edge. Importantly, the distinct actin filaments are characteristically associated with discrete adhesion structures and both the adhesions and the actin filaments are co-ordinately regulated during cell migration. While it has long been known that these macromolecular structures are intimately linked in cells, precisely how they are co-ordinately regulated is presently unknown. Live imaging data now suggests that the focal adhesions may act as sites of actin polymerization resulting in the generation of tension-bearing actin bundles of actin filaments (stress fibers). Moreover, a picture is emerging to suggest that the tropomyosin family of proteins that can determine actin filament dynamics may also play a key role in determining the transition between adhesion states. Molecules such as the tropomyosins are therefore tantalizing candidates to orchestrate the coordination of actin and adhesion dynamics during mesenchymal cell migration.

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