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Control of Microbial Adhesion as a Strategy for Food and Bioprocess Technology

Authors
  • Araújo, Emiliane Andrade1
  • de Andrade, Nélio José1
  • da Silva, Luis Henrique Mendes2
  • de Carvalho, Antônio Fernandes1
  • de Sá Silva, Cleuber Antônio1
  • Ramos, Afonso Mota1
  • 1 Federal University of Vicosa, Minas Gerais State, Food Technology Department, AP. H. Rolfs Avenue, w/n, Universitary Campus, Viçosa, Minas Gerais, 36570-000, Brazil , Viçosa (Brazil)
  • 2 Federal University of Vicosa, Minas Gerais State, Chemistry Department, AP. H. Rolfs Avenue, w/n, Universitary Campus, Viçosa, Minas Gerais, 36570-000, Brazil , Viçosa (Brazil)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Food and Bioprocess Technology
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Nov 23, 2009
Volume
3
Issue
3
Pages
321–332
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11947-009-0290-z
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
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Abstract

Bacteria and other microorganisms have a natural tendency to adhere to surfaces as a survival mechanism. This can occur in many environments, including the living host, industrial systems, and natural waters. The general outcome of bacterial colonization of a surface is biofilm formation, which consists of microorganisms immobilized in a variety of polymeric compounds generally referred to as extracellular polymeric substances. Bacterial adhesion to a solid surface is a crucial step in the biofilm process. This step is dependent upon van der Waals, electrostatic, and acid–base interactions. These interactions are influenced by physicochemical properties of the substratum and the bacterial surface, such as hydrophobicity, surface charge, and electron donor–electron acceptor properties. In addition, the roughness of the substratum and the microbiological characteristics of the cell surface, such as cellular appendages and production of exopolysaccharides, can affect the adherence process. To date, many strategies have been developed to decrease the adherence of bacteria to surfaces. Surface modification with the addition of the suitable compounds makes surfaces less attractive for microorganisms and therefore prevents bacterial adherence and biofilm formation.

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