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The Control of an Invasive Bivalve, Corbicula fluminea, Using Gas Impermeable Benthic Barriers in a Large Natural Lake

Authors
  • Wittmann, Marion E.1, 2
  • Chandra, Sudeep3
  • Reuter, John E.1, 4
  • Schladow, S. Geoffrey1
  • Allen, Brant C.1
  • Webb, Katie J.1
  • 1 University of California Davis, Tahoe Environmental Research Center, 291 Country Club Drive, Incline Village, NV, 89451, USA , Incline Village (United States)
  • 2 University of Notre Dame, Department of Biological Sciences, Notre Dame, IN, 46556-0369, USA , Notre Dame (United States)
  • 3 University of Nevada Reno, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science, 1664 N. Virginia St., Reno, NV, 89512, USA , Reno (United States)
  • 4 University of California, Department of Environmental Science and Policy, Davis, CA, 95616, USA , Davis (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Environmental Management
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Apr 05, 2012
Volume
49
Issue
6
Pages
1163–1173
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00267-012-9850-5
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

Anoxia can restrict species establishment in aquatic systems and the artificial promotion of these conditions can provide an effective control strategy for invasive molluscs. Low abundances (2–20 m−2) of the nonnative bivalve, Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea), were first recorded in Lake Tahoe, CA–NV in 2002 and by 2010 nuisance-level population densities (>10,000 m−2) were observed. A non-chemical control method using gas impermeable benthic barriers to reduce dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations available to C. fluminea was tested in this ultra-oligotrophic natural lake. In 2009, the impact of ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) sheets (9 m2, n = 6) on C. fluminea beds was tested on 1–7 day intervals over a 56 day period (August–September). At an average water temperature of 18 °C, DO concentrations under these small barriers were reduced to zero after 72 h resulting in 100 % C. fluminea mortality after 28 days. In 2010, a large EPDM barrier (1,950 m2) was applied to C. fluminea populations for 120 days (July–November). C. fluminea abundances were reduced over 98 % after barrier removal, and remained significantly reduced (>90 %) 1 year later. Non-target benthic macroinvertebrate abundances were also reduced, with variable taxon-specific recolonization rates. High C. fluminea abundance under anoxic conditions increased the release of ammonium and soluble reactive phosphorus from the sediment substrate; but levels of unionized ammonia were low at 0.004–0.005 mg L−1. Prolonged exposure to anoxia using benthic barriers can provide an effective short term control strategy for C. fluminea.

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