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Contribution of lower physical activity levels to higher risk of insulin resistance and associated metabolic disturbances in South Asians compared to Europeans.

Authors
  • Afaq, Saima1, 2
  • Kooner, Angad S3
  • Loh, Marie1
  • Kooner, Jaspal S4, 5, 6
  • Chambers, John C1, 4, 5, 7, 8
  • 1 Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, Norfolk Place, London, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 2 Institute of Public health and Social Sciences, Khyber medical university, Peshawar, Pakistan. , (Pakistan)
  • 3 Hillingdon hospital, NHS Trust, Hillingdon, Greater London, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 4 Hammersmith Hospital, London, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 5 Ealing Hospital, Southall, Middlesex, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 6 NHLI, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, London, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 7 MRC-HPA Centre for Environment and Health, Imperial College London, Norfolk Place, London, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 8 Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore. , (Singapore)
Type
Published Article
Journal
PLoS ONE
Publisher
Public Library of Science
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2019
Volume
14
Issue
5
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0216354
PMID: 31063476
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Insulin resistance and related metabolic disturbances are major risk factors for the higher T2D risk and associated morbidity and mortality amongst South Asians. The contribution of physical activity to the increased prevalence of insulin resistance and related disturbances amongst South Asians is unknown. We recruited 902 South Asian and European men and women, aged 35-85 years from the ongoing LOLIPOP study. Clinical characterisation comprised standardised questionnaire and measurement of height, weight, waist and hip circumference and blood pressure. Fasting bloods were taken for assessment of glucose, insulin, lipids and HbA1c. Physical activity was quantified using a validated accelerometer, Actigraph GT3X+, worn for 7 days. Univariate and multivariate approaches were used to investigate the relationship between ethnicity, physical activity, insulin resistance and related metabolic disturbances. Total physical activity was ~31% (P = 0.01) lower amongst South Asians compared to Europeans (Mean MET.minutes [SD]: 1505.2 [52] vs. 2050.9 [86.6], P<0.001). After adjusting for age and sex, total physical activity had a negative association with HOMA-IR (B [SE]: -0.18 [0.08], P = 0.04) and fasting glucose levels (B[SE]: -0.11 [0.04], P = 0.02). There was no association between physical activity and other glycemic and lipid parameters. Total physical activity per week contributed towards the differences in insulin resistance and associated metabolic disturbances between South Asians and Europeans. Lower levels of physical activity may contribute to the increased insulin resistance in South Asians compared to Europeans. Our results suggest that lifestyle modification through increased physical activity may help to improve glucose metabolism and reduce the burden of excess T2D and related complications amongst South Asians.

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