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Continuous root xylem formation and vascular acclimation to water deficit involves endodermal ABA signalling via miR165.

Authors
  • Ramachandran, Prashanth1
  • Wang, Guodong1
  • Augstein, Frauke1
  • de Vries, Jan1
  • Carlsbecker, Annelie2
  • 1 Department of Organismal Biology, Physiological Botany, Evolutionary Biology Centre and Linnean Centre for Plant Biology, Uppsala University, Ullsv. 24E, SE-75651 Uppsala, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 2 Department of Organismal Biology, Physiological Botany, Evolutionary Biology Centre and Linnean Centre for Plant Biology, Uppsala University, Ullsv. 24E, SE-75651 Uppsala, Sweden [email protected] , (Sweden)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Development
Publisher
The Company of Biologists
Publication Date
Feb 05, 2018
Volume
145
Issue
3
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1242/dev.159202
PMID: 29361572
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

The plant root xylem comprises a specialized tissue for water distribution to the shoot. Despite its importance, its potential morphological plasticity in response to environmental conditions such as limited water availability has not been thoroughly studied. Here, we identify a role for the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) for proper xylem development and describe how ABA signalling-mediated effects on core developmental regulators are employed to alter xylem morphology under limited water availability in Arabidopsis Plants with impaired ABA biosynthesis and reduced ABA signalling in the cell layer surrounding the vasculature displayed defects in xylem continuity, suggesting that non-cell autonomous ABA signalling is required for proper xylem development. Conversely, upon external ABA application or under limited water availability, extra xylem strands were formed. The observed xylem developmental alterations were dependent on adequate endodermal ABA signalling, which activated MIR165A. This resulted in increased miR165 levels that repress class III HD-ZIP transcription factors in the stele. We conclude that a pathway known to control core developmental features is employed as a means of modifying plant xylem morphology under conditions of environmental stress.

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