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Construct validation of the Research Engagement Survey Tool (REST).

Authors
  • Goodman, Melody S1
  • Ackermann, Nicole2
  • Haskell-Craig, Zoé3
  • Jackson, Sherrill4
  • Bowen, Deborah J5
  • Sanders Thompson, Vetta L2
  • 1 New York University School of Global Public Health, New York, USA. [email protected]
  • 2 Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, USA.
  • 3 New York University School of Global Public Health, New York, USA.
  • 4 The Breakfast Club, Inc., Florissant, USA.
  • 5 University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Research involvement and engagement
Publication Date
Jun 16, 2022
Volume
8
Issue
1
Pages
26–26
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/s40900-022-00360-y
PMID: 35710531
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Researchers often conduct studies with partners (e.g., patients, caregivers, advocates, clinicians, community members) who also have an interest in the research topic. Depending on the research study the level of partner engagement in the research process may be high or low. Partners may be involved from the beginning including determining what topic to study and what questions the study should examine. They may suggest who should be included in the study, the geographic area of focus, and the outcome measures to be examined. In addition, they may help recruit study participants, interpret study results, and plan for how to share the results with those that need to know. No standard way exists to find out how involved a partner has been in a study from the partner’s perspective. Here we develop and validate survey questions to measure the level of partner engagement in research studies. We looked at existing survey questions used to measure similar topics to make sure that a person who takes the survey gets consistent scores. We tested the survey with community health stakeholders (e.g., patients, caregivers, advocates, clinicians, community members) who are research partners for studies at universities across the United States. Over 2 years, the partners took different versions of the survey online four times. We used the data we collected from each survey to revise the questions and make sure that it measures partner involvement accurately and reliably. The Research Engagement Survey Tool (REST) has 32 questions to examine eight engagement principles on two scales: quantity (how much) and quality (how well). The REST is a valid and reliable tool to examine partner engagement in research.

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