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Cone-shaped HIV-1 capsids are transported through intact nuclear pores

Authors
  • Zila, Vojtech1
  • Margiotta, Erica2, 3
  • Turoňová, Beata2
  • Müller, Thorsten G.1
  • Zimmerli, Christian E.2
  • Mattei, Simone2, 4, 5
  • Allegretti, Matteo2
  • Börner, Kathleen1, 6
  • Rada, Jona1
  • Müller, Barbara1
  • Lusic, Marina1, 6
  • Kräusslich, Hans-Georg1, 6
  • Beck, Martin2, 7
  • 1 Department of Infectious Diseases, Virology, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
  • 2 European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Structural and Computational Biology Unit, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany
  • 3 Collaboration for joint PhD degree between EMBL and Heidelberg University, Faculty of Biosciences, Heidelberg, Germany
  • 4 Department of Biology, Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland
  • 5 European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Imaging Center, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany
  • 6 German Center for Infection Research, partner site Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
  • 7 Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Department of Molecular Sociology, 60438 Frankfurt, Germany
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cell
Publisher
Cell Press
Publication Date
Feb 18, 2021
Volume
184
Issue
4
Pages
1032–1046
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2021.01.025
PMID: 33571428
PMCID: PMC7895898
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Visualization of nuclear translocation of HIV-1 capsids by 3D correlative fluorescence light and electron microscope, combined with cryoelectron tomography, demonstrates that nuclear pore complexes in infected T cells are sufficiently dilated to allow cone-shaped HIV-1 capsids to pass through.

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