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Conditional admission, religious exemption type, and nonmedical vaccine exemptions in California before and after a state policy change.

Authors
  • Buttenheim, Alison M1
  • Jones, Malia2
  • Mckown, Caitlin3
  • Salmon, Daniel4
  • Omer, Saad B5
  • 1 Department of Family and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, 416 Fagin Hall, 418 Curie Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United States)
  • 2 Applied Population Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1450 Linden Dr Ste. 316, Madison, WI 53706, United States. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Mali)
  • 3 Applied Population Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1450 Linden Dr Ste. 316, Madison, WI 53706, United States. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United States)
  • 4 International Health Department, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, W5035, Baltimore, MD 21202, United States. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United States)
  • 5 Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, 1518 Clifton Road, Room 7017, Atlanta, GA 30033, United States. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Vaccine
Publication Date
Jun 18, 2018
Volume
36
Issue
26
Pages
3789–3793
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2018.05.050
PMID: 29778514
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Recent measles and pertussis outbreaks in the US have focused national attention on state laws governing exemptions from mandatory vaccines for school entry. After several years of increases in nonmedical exemptions in California, the state assembly passed Assembly Bill 2109 in 2012, making nonmedical exemptions more difficult to obtain by requiring parents to obtain a signature from a health care provider. We used data from the California Department of Public Health to describe changes in the overall prevalence of personal belief exemptions and compositional changes in immunization status for the school years 2012-2013 through 2015-2016. Following the implementation of Assembly Bill 2109, the statewide exemption rate declined from 3.1% in 2013 to 2.5% in 2014 and then to 2.3% in 2015, representing a 25% reduction from the 2013 peak. Continued surveillance of exemption rates and vaccine refusal are needed to monitor and protect herd immunity against vaccine-preventable diseases.

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