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Concurrent and lagged effects of psychosocial job stressors on symptoms of burnout.

Authors
  • Hadžibajramović, Emina1, 2
  • Ahlborg, Gunnar Jr3, 4
  • Grimby-Ekman, Anna2
  • 1 Institute of Stress Medicine, Region Västra Götaland, Carl Skottsbergs gata 22 B, SE-413 19, Gothenburg, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 2 Health Metrics, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 3 Institute of Stress Medicine, Region Västra Götaland, Carl Skottsbergs gata 22 B, SE-413 19, Gothenburg, Sweden. [email protected] , (Sweden)
  • 4 Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. [email protected] , (Sweden)
Type
Published Article
Journal
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2019
Volume
92
Issue
7
Pages
1013–1021
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00420-019-01437-0
PMID: 31111207
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Burnout is a mental condition described as being a result of long-term stressors commonly related to psychosocial factors at work. The aim of the present study was to investigate longitudinal relationships between job demands, decision authority, effort and reward, and symptoms of burnout, as well as the joint effects of job demands and decision authority, and of effort and reward. The data came from a four-wave longitudinal cohort study of Swedish health care workers. Longitudinal associations were analysed using mixed effects regression models with random intercept. The concurrent analysis showed that demand and decision authority, as well as effort and reward, were associated with symptoms of burnout over time. Evidence of the lagged effects of workplace factors on burnout symptoms was limited to reward. No clear effect modification was found. An increase in unfavourable working conditions implied increasing scores on the burnout measure over time. The concurrent effects of job demands, decision authority, effort and reward on symptoms of burnout were seen. The evidence of lagged effects was limited to the low-reward condition. Regularly monitoring these work environment conditions at workplaces can help identify risk situations for burnout and thus be useful in the prevention of work-related mental illness. Lastly, a new approach to defining the risk groups was proposed, which is consistent across different populations and time points.

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