Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Concomitant Irritable Bowel Syndrome Does Not Influence the Response to Antimicrobial Therapy in Patients with Functional Dyspepsia.

Authors
  • Shah, Ayesha1, 2, 3, 4, 5
  • Gurusamy, Saravana Ruban1, 2
  • Hansen, Teressa2
  • Callaghan, Gavin2, 6
  • Talley, Nicholas J3, 4, 5, 7
  • Koloski, Natasha1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8
  • Walker, Marjorie M3, 4, 5, 7
  • Jones, Michael P3, 4, 5, 9
  • Morrison, Mark1, 3, 4, 5, 10
  • Holtmann, Gerald J11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16
  • 1 Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 2 Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Queensland, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Ipswich Road, Brisbane, Woolloongabba, QLD, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 3 Australian Gastrointestinal Research Alliance, Brisbane, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 4 Australian Gastrointestinal Research Alliance, Newcastle, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 5 Australian Gastrointestinal Research Alliance, Sydney, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 6 Department of Pharmacy, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 7 Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 8 Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, University of Queensland, Herston, QLD, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 9 Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 10 Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Woolloongabba, QLD, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 11 Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia. [email protected] , (Australia)
  • 12 Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Queensland, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Ipswich Road, Brisbane, Woolloongabba, QLD, Australia. [email protected] , (Australia)
  • 13 Australian Gastrointestinal Research Alliance, Brisbane, Australia. [email protected] , (Australia)
  • 14 Australian Gastrointestinal Research Alliance, Newcastle, Australia. [email protected] , (Australia)
  • 15 Australian Gastrointestinal Research Alliance, Sydney, Australia. [email protected] , (Australia)
  • 16 Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, University of Queensland, Herston, QLD, Australia. [email protected] , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Digestive Diseases and Sciences
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2022
Volume
67
Issue
6
Pages
2299–2309
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10620-021-07149-1
PMID: 34392491
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Antimicrobial therapy improves symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but the efficacy in functional dyspepsia (FD) is largely unknown. While FD and IBS frequently overlap, it is unknown if concomitant IBS in FD alters the response to antimicrobial therapy in FD. Thus, we aimed to assess and compare the effect of antimicrobial therapy on visceral sensory function and symptom improvement in FD patients with and without IBS. Adult patients with FD with or without IBS received rifaximin 550 mg BD for 10 days, followed by a 6-week follow-up period. The total gastrointestinal symptom score as measured by the SAGIS (Structured Assessment of Gastrointestinal Symptoms) questionnaire and subscores (dyspepsia, diarrhea, and constipation), symptom response to a standardized nutrient challenge and normalization of the glucose breath tests were measured. Twenty-one consecutive adult patients with FD and 14/21 with concomitant IBS were recruited. Treatment with rifaximin resulted in a significant (p = 0.017) improvement in the total SAGIS score from 34.7 (± 15.4) at baseline to 26.0 (± 16.8) at 2 weeks and 25.6 (± 17.8) at 6 weeks post-treatment. Similarly, compared to baseline there was a statistically significant improvement in SAGIS subscores for dyspepsia and diarrhea (all p < 0.05) and effects persisted for 6 weeks post-treatment. Similarly, the symptom score (and subscores) following a standardized nutrient challenge improved significantly (p < 0.001) 2 weeks post-treatment. The presence of concomitant IBS did not significantly influence the improvement of symptoms after antibiotic therapy (all p > 0.5). In FD patients, the response to antimicrobial therapy with rifaximin is not influenced by concomitant IBS symptoms. © 2021. The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times