Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Computerized-Adaptive vs. Traditional Ratings of Depression and Suicidal Thoughts: An Assay Sensitivity Pilot Study in a Ketamine Clinical Trial.

Authors
  • Grunebaum, Michael F1
  • Mann, J John1
  • Galfalvy, Hanga C1
  • Gibbons, Robert D2
  • 1 Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Medical Center and New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, United States. , (United States)
  • 2 Departments of Medicine and Public Health Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States. , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Frontiers in Psychiatry
Publisher
Frontiers Media SA
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2021
Volume
12
Pages
602976–602976
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3389/fpsyt.2021.602976
PMID: 33897480
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

There is a public health need for improved suicide risk assessment tools. This pilot methodology study compared the assay sensitivity of computerized adaptive tests (CAT) of depression and suicidal ideation vs. traditional ratings in a randomized trial subgroup. The last 20 persons to enroll in a published ketamine trial in suicidal depression were studied. This subgroup received traditional and CAT ratings at baseline, 24 h post-infusion and follow-up week 2, 4, and 6: Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, and Beck Scale for Suicidal Ideation vs. the CAT-Depression Inventory and CAT-Suicide Scale. Results showed larger effect sizes (ES) for CAT compared with traditional clinician-rated and self-report scales. Coefficients of variation for baseline measurements were lower for CAT compared with traditional scales. This is the first study to show that CAT may have greater assay sensitivity for treatment effects, particularly for suicidal ideation, compared with traditional clinician-rated and non-adaptive self-rated scales in a randomized trial. The findings suggest CAT can enable quick long-term follow-up assessments via cellphone, tablet, or computer while minimizing response bias due to repeated measurement of the same symptom items. Clinical Trial Registration: www.ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT01700829. Copyright © 2021 Grunebaum, Mann, Galfalvy and Gibbons.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times