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The composition of the bacterial community in the foam produced by Mahanarva fimbriolata is distinct from those at gut and soil.

Authors
  • Tonelli, Mateus1
  • Cotta, Simone Raposo2
  • Rigotto, Alessandra2
  • Dias, Armando Cavalcante F2
  • Andreote, Fernando Dini2
  • Bento, José Maurício S3, 4
  • 1 Department of Entomology and Acarology, "Luiz de Queiroz" College of Agriculture, University of São Paulo, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 2 Department of Soil Science, "Luiz de Queiroz" College of Agriculture, University of São Paulo, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 3 Department of Entomology and Acarology, "Luiz de Queiroz" College of Agriculture, University of São Paulo, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil. [email protected] , (Brazil)
  • 4 Laboratory of Chemical Ecology and Insect Behavior, ESALQ/USP, Av. Pádua Dias 11, Piracicaba, SP, 13418-900, Brazil. [email protected] , (Brazil)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Brazilian journal of microbiology : [publication of the Brazilian Society for Microbiology]
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2020
Volume
51
Issue
3
Pages
1151–1157
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s42770-019-00211-1
PMID: 31898244
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The development of insects is strongly influenced by their resident microorganisms. Symbionts play key roles in insect nutrition, reproduction, and defense. Bacteria are important partners due to the wide diversity of their biochemical pathways that aid in the host development. We present evidence that the foam produced by nymphs of the spittlebug Mahanarva fimbriolata harbors a diversity of bacteria, including some that were previously reported as defensive symbionts of insects. Analysis of the microbiomes in the nymph gut and the soil close to the foam showed that the microorganisms in the foam were more closely related to those in the gut than in the soil, suggesting that the bacteria are actively introduced into the foam by the insect. Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Acidobacteria were the predominant groups found in the foam. Since members of Actinobacteria have been found to protect different species of insects by producing secondary metabolites with antibiotic properties, we speculate that the froth produced by M. fimbriolata may aid in defending the nymphs against entomopathogenic microorganisms.

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