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The complete genomic sequence of a novel cold-adapted bacterium, Planococcus maritimus Y42, isolated from crude oil-contaminated soil

Authors
  • Yang, Ruiqi1, 2, 3
  • Liu, Guangxiu1, 2
  • Chen, Tuo2, 4
  • Zhang, Wei1, 2
  • Zhang, Gaosen1, 2
  • Chang, Sijing2, 4, 3
  • 1 Key Laboratory of Desert and Desertification, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000, China , Lanzhou (China)
  • 2 Key Laboratory of Extreme Environmental Microbial Resources and Engineering, Lanzhou, Gansu Province, 730000, China , Lanzhou (China)
  • 3 University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.19A Yuquan Road, Beijing, 100049, China , Beijing (China)
  • 4 State Key Laboratory of Cryospheric Sciences, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000, China , Lanzhou (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Standards in Genomic Sciences
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
Oct 10, 2018
Volume
13
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/s40793-018-0328-9
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Planococcus maritimus Y42, isolated from the petroleum-contaminated soil of the Qaidam Basin, can use crude oil as its sole source of carbon and energy at 20 °C. The genome of P. maritimus strain Y42 has been sequenced to provide information on its properties. Genomic analysis shows that the genome of strain Y42 contains one circular DNA chromosome with a size of 3,718,896 bp and a GC content of 48.8%, and three plasmids (329,482; 89,073; and 12,282 bp). Although the strain Y42 did not show a remarkably higher ability in degrading crude oil than other oil-degrading bacteria, the existence of strain Y42 played a significant role to reducing the overall environmental impact as an indigenous oil-degrading bacterium. In addition, genome annotation revealed that strain Y42 has many genes responsible for hydrocarbon degradation. Structural features of the genomes might provide a competitive edge for P. maritimus strain Y42 to survive in oil-polluted environments and be worthy of further study in oil degradation for the recovery of crude oil-polluted environments.

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